Flash Friday: Medieval Cop 5-The Secrets of Lucifer’s Wings(Spoilers for previous games)

Welcome to Flash Friday! This is where I look at some of the awesome and creative flash games you can play for free on the Internet. After the epic roller coaster ride that was The Invidia Games, Medieval Cop 5-The Secrets of Lucifer’s Wings slows down the pace as Dregg travels to the Kingdom of Enio to find a way to cure his (kind of) friend who is still recovering from the last game. Does Lucifer’s Wings do a good job of maintaining the momentum that GeminiGamer has built up the previous four games? Let’s find out!

The game takes place shortly after Dregg and his ragtag team of misfits win the Invidia Games for the Kingdom of Rightia with Dregg about to sit down to a meal with his sister and her family before suddenly being kidnapped by a strange group. Soon after, you find out it is the same weird organisation that Felicia(you should know who she is unless you haven’t played the previous games in which case STOP spoiling it for yourself) belongs to and her father, who just so happens to also be the leader isn’t very happy with you. Felicia pushed herself too much in the games after using her powerful “Wings of Lucifer” technique and will soon die… unless you can obtain the ancient book: “The Secrets of Lucifer’s Wings” which contains the cure. Unfortunately, it isn’t just a simple matter of borrowing it from the Museum as it was recently stolen by The Great Magnifico and his assistants. Luckily for Dregg however, Magnifico always leaves a clue alluding to the priceless artefact he is going to steal next which seems to be one of the exhibits at the Enio Museum. So, it’s up to Dregg to journey to Enio, capture Magnifico and bring back the book before it’s too late for Felicia… but is it really that simple?

Suffice to say, I enjoyed the story in this entry of Medieval Cop. While the previous two games in the series had a more “Kingdom in peril” story to them, the story this time is more personal. Felicia is (probably) one of Dregg’s friends and she got so badly injured on Dregg’s watch. He was the leader of Rightia’s team in the Invidia Games and as he told another leader in a powerful monologue in the previous game, the leader needs to take responsibility for the members of their team. As well as giving Dregg a larger incentive to solve a case, it gives you, as the player, more incentive to play the game. I mentioned in my previous Medieval Cop review that I thought Felicia was one of the best written characters after Dregg and this only served to make me more attached. Writing has always been a strong point of GeminiGamer but like everything else, it is slowly getting even better with each new entry in the series.

However, the pace has slowed right down, almost to a crawl after the events of the previous game. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, it allows you to have a breath of fresh air to process everything that happened but at the same time it makes the game a bit less thrilling to play until the very end when it picks up again. The slow pace is mainly due to the majority of the game taking place in a single area: the aforementioned Enio Museum. What makes it better than the first game, which also takes place in a single area, is its size. You could see the room you spend the majority of the game in in a single screen in the first game but the Enio Museum is much larger with more people and more objects to interact with and hear Dregg’s pessimistic perspective on. Again, however, this unfortunately serves as a double-edged blade. Most of what you’ll be doing in the game is going around the museum and interacting with these objects again and again and again to get clues. At one point in the game, you are even tasked with checking EVERY SINGLE plant pot in the museum albeit in a humorous fashion.

Thankfully, the witty writing and interesting characters more than make up for the mundanity of these tasks. The Great Magnifico and his assistants are vibrant characters with fun personalities. They don’t even need to speak to be good characters; one of the best scenes in the game shows the thieves robbing the museum right behind the guard’s backs and their physical actions alone just reek of personality. This is even more impressive considering how tiny the character sprites are that make it difficult to see subtle movements and gestures. As well as that, the Enio team that took part in the Invidia Games are also present since… well, it’s their kingdom and the princess wants to catch the crook to demonstrate Enio’s might.

Finally, the dimensional debate at the end is thrilling although short. I hope to see a lot more of them after The Invidia Games proved how epic they could be and how much excitement they can add to making simple deductions and guesses. Judging from your opponent and the ending that caught me completely off guard, a solid story is beginning to rear its head and I’m intrigued to see where it goes. Maybe, the story will escalate further in the next game in the series! Overall, although it can be quite monotonous at times, the consistently well-written story, humour and characters as well as the epic music hold it up. A welcome breath of fresh air after The Invidia Games though I hope the next games in the series can raise the bar The Invidia Games set even higher.

Pros:

  • Free
  • Vibrant characters
  • Story is beginning to raise the stakes
  • More personal plot
  • Well-written
  • Epic music

Cons:

  • Slow pace compared to previous game
  • Mundane tasks
  • Grammar and spelling errors

Verdict: 8/10

Play it here: http://www.kongregate.com/games/vasantj/medieval-cop-v-the-secrets-of-lucifers-wings

Support the creator’s Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=2572101

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